Colorado Rockies Have Plenty Of Depth: Now Is The Time To Trade Atkins

Garrett Atkins is a career .298 hitter
Trade Garrett Atkins?

Many probably think I’m crazy for this statement. Perhaps I am.

After trading away the club’s star player (Matt Holliday) and losing the best closer (Brian Fuentes) in team history over the offseason, it’s easy to assume that trading Atkins, arguably one of the team’s most talented players, means throwing away the season for the Rockies.

And although I’m not one of the rare few who support the front office’s plan of building from within and starting over once those players become too good and too expensive, I think that trading Atkins could bring some positives to the team.

Without a doubt, pitching has been the Rockies’ biggest struggle for as long as I can remember. With Jeff Francis missing all of 2009, this year is no different.

Even without Holliday and Willy Tavares, the outfield is stacked. Brad Hawpe and Ryan Spilborghs will be starters, while prospect Dexter Fowler is trying to prove that he’s also big-league ready. Seth Smith, Matt Murton, Scott Podsednik, Carlos Gonzalez and even Ian Stewart and Jeff Baker are also viable options.

In 2008, the Rockies used more second baseman than I can count on one of my hands. Despite the fact that none of them have stepped into the shoes that Kaz Matsui left in 2007, there is depth at the position.

Troy Tulowitzki is a lock at short stop, and many of the second baseman can shift to play either middle infield position when he needs rest.

Todd Helton will get the first look at first base, but with his unstable lower back, it is uncertain how much or how often he will play in 2009. Behind him, the Rockies could use Joe Koshansky as the primary starter.

Baker, a very versatile player, has experience at first base, while Christian Colonel, who is having a very impressive spring, will be waiting in the minors.

Chris Iannetta has more than earned the starting catching role, and although Yorvit Torrealba wants out of his contract with Colorado, teams aren’t showing interest in paying his remaining salary, meaning the Rockies will have a veteran catcher with plenty of experience coming off the bench.

That brings us to Garrett Atkins and third base.

Don’t get me wrong, Atkins is a proven player with a lot of talent. His career batting average is right around .300, he has plenty of power and his defense is on the rise.

It may seem foolish to trade a star, but that’s what makes this idea work. Stars draw interest.

Stewart has proven that he is more than ready to start for the Rockies this year. He greatly improved towards the end of 2008 and has been playing solid all spring. Not to mention that his defense would be a step up, and that he is still just 23 years old and still improving.

The Rockies need to get him in the lineup.

Atkins will most likely be gone after this season with his contract ending, so it would be ideal to get some value for him.

It doesn’t matter how we get it, but the fact is, the Rockies need starting pitching.

As shown, there is quality depth at nearly every position, which should draw interest. Many of these players are ready for the big leagues, there’s just no room for them.

Who knows, there might not be teams that are willing to give up their top arms, but it doesn’t hurt to at least give it a shot and see what’s out there. There are several teams that are in need of a third baseman.

The Rockies have plenty of talent to replace Atkins. Losing him and gaining solid starting pitching will only improve the team.

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4 comments

  1. nichallisey

    Kyle,

    Thanks for the reads and comments.

    I’d have to agree with you, you guys do have some depth regarding pitching, but I don’t think our players want to face Atkins 19 games a year.

  2. nichallisey

    Rockieslube,

    Thanks for the read and comment. I wrote the article a while back, but with Atkins sitting each night, the statement becomes more evident.

    I’m glad to see we signed a reliever today, though. It’s a positive step.

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